de Stijl 1917-1931. Paul RAND, his copy, H. L. C. JAFFE.
de Stijl 1917-1931
de Stijl 1917-1931
de Stijl 1917-1931
de Stijl 1917-1931
de Stijl 1917-1931
de Stijl 1917-1931
de Stijl 1917-1931
de Stijl 1917-1931
de Stijl 1917-1931

de Stijl 1917-1931

London: Alec Teranti, Ltd, 1956. 8vo (235 x 178 mm; 9¼ x 7 in.). viii, 293 pp. Four color plates showing designs by Mondrian, Rietveld, Van der Leck, and Van Doesburg and Van Eesteren; and 48 black-and-white plates at end on 24 sheets. Original cloth. Light age-toning to sheet edges; minor handling wear to binding. Item #403038

A superb association copy, given by Hans Schleger to Paul Rand in 1969 and annotated by Rand, inscribed in Rand's hand on the title-page: “London Oct 3.69 from Hans Schleger.”

Extensively annotated by Paul Rand: 71 pages bear a total of 164 of Rand's penciled notes, underlinings, and doodles. In total, 91 phrases or sentences are underlined, 63 notes in margins repeat or amplify ideas, and there are five doodles, four annotated commentaries, and one correction.

Paul Rand, the leading American modern graphic designer of the day, visited Hans Schleger (1898-1976) in the autumn of 1969 in London. Rand admired Zero, as Schleger fashioned himself, once praising his role in modern design: “Hans Schleger was a graphic designer before the concept of graphic designer was invented.” Zero pioneered the concept of corporate identity, working on logos and branding for John Lewis, Penguin Press, and Finmar Furniture, among other companies. The two designers met soon after the war at the Arts Club in Dover. “It was only a short time after we left the club that we were walking arm-in-arm along Piccadilly, destined to be friends” (Paul Rand, Graphis 188). Rand wrote the forward to the first comprehensive survey of Zero’s work, published by Princeton Architectural Press in 1994.

This book is a significant document in the history of modern design, and especially in the relationship between European and American schools, for Rand was “the channel through which European modern art and design – Russian Constructivism, Dutch De Stijl and the German Bauhaus – was introduced to American commercial art” (Heller, Paul Rand, London, Phaidon, 1999, p. 12).

Rand shows an active engagement with Jaffe's book, early in the text marginally noting “dynamic equilibrium” (p. 5) as an ideal of the movement. A number of Rand's notes mark points of comparison with Bauhaus tenets, and at one point he makes special reference to the concept of play in de Stijl practices (p. 100). There are several notes in the section on Van Doesberg's writings on a new architecture (pp. 160-61). A rather vehement note of “No Math!” accompanies Jaffe's writings on the need to step away from mathematical composition (pp. 104-105).

This significant association copy, connecting two 20th century masters to one of its major design movements, is accompanied by two evocative documents of the trip:

1. Paul Rand's boarding pass from his flight aboard the Concorde. Rand's name is written in twice on the die-cut ticket. He sat in seat 1B.

2. Rand's hand-written notes and drawings on a sheet of lined paper (illustrated at right). Includes a dozen small drawings in blue ink, and notes for a lecture on de Stijl (including a reference to Matisse): “The story of modern art is the story of The Transformation of the 3 dimensional world of the documentary to the 2 dimensional world of the imaginary.” Two pages on one sheet, 8 x 5 inches.

Price: $1,500.00 save 15% $1,275.00

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